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The King's Ginger From London, England

A High-Strength Ginger Liqueur Fit For A King Is Brought Back To Life From A Historic Recipe

thekingsginger.com

A High-Strength Ginger Liqueur Fit For A King Is Brought Back To Life From A Historic Recipe

thekingsginger.com

Berry Bros. & Rudd

Berry Bros. & Rudd was established in 1698 at No.3 St. James’s Street in London, just up the street from St. James’s Palace, where the future King Edward VII was born in 1841. In 1760, Berry Bros. began supplying wine and spirits to the British Royal Family, and they continue to do so to this day.

King Edward VII

In 1901, King Edward VII succeeded Queen Victoria as King of England and Emperor of India, though he had a reputation for being more a socialite than a statesman. Prior to becoming King, Edward was a leader of London society and the fashionable elite, spending his time drinking, gambling, shooting, racing, sailing and eating. 

A Liqueur Fit for a King

In 1900, Edward bought a Daimler car, and thus became the first member of the Royal family to own an automobile. In 1905, he purchased seven more Daimlers in a single year. The Royal Physician became concerned about the monarch’s health, exposed as he was to the elements by his passion for riding these horseless carriages. In 1903, Berry Bros. was granted a Royal Warrant and commissioned to formulate a liqueur which would warm and revivify His Majesty during his morning rides: The King’s Ginger was born. In addition to serving as a tonic after a session of driving, The King’s Ginger also became a tradition at the King’s hunts. It is no coincidence, perhaps, that in the first season after the creation of the ginger liqueur, a record 1,300 partridge were shot in one day at Sandringham. In 2009, more than a century later, Berry Bros. & Rudd resumed production of The King’s Ginger for a new generation to enjoy.